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Poster: cosmicola Date: Jun 18, 2009 3:38pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Pearl Horbor

Copies which, by being made without consent of and fair payment to the creator of the work, deny the creator of the work fair compensation for the goods OR services (however you choose to label it) they are providing for your entertainment. Be they a wealthy studio mogul, or a broke indie living in his car.

Theft is theft.

This post was modified by cosmicola on 2009-06-18 22:38:44

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Poster: Moongleam Date: Jun 19, 2009 1:00pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Pearl Horbor

As Video-Cellar pointed out, even the courts don't call it "theft"; it's copyright infringement.

The statement "Theft is theft" doesn't help us determine what is theft and what is not theft.

I'm not debating whether copying films that are under copyright is lawful or ethical. I'm simply stating the obvious:
No one is removing goods from the merchant's inventory.


This post was modified by Moongleam on 2009-06-19 20:00:29

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Poster: IanKoro Date: Jun 18, 2009 6:24pm
Forum: feature_films Subject: Re: Pearl Horbor

Only (in my experience) the "broke indie living in his car" is far more likely to want to give away his material for free, and be happy to learn someone actually has an interest in his material.

A few things though: If I download a copyrighted movie from 1935, NOBODY involved in the making of the movie is profiting. The very idea that I can go and buy the rights to a movie that is 75 years old, and then continue to profit from its sale is complete and utter bullshit. I didn't have anything to do with making it. I just happened to have enough money to buy myself the right to make more money.

If that's morally right, and downloading a copy of "All Quiet on the Western Front" is morally wrong, then... well, I don't even know what that says about morality.

Then again, how is the movie industry ever going to be able to continue to bring us high quality, high budget fare like Pearl Harbor (2001), if we don't continue to pay for the DVDs of these wonderful pieces of art?